Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for April, 2010

We planing to explore our treditional poultry breed protection ,so we are building one poultry house to keeping treditional cocks and broody hens then manage natural incubation of eggs,it is eco friendly and conservation of natural eco system .
We put 60 eggs in the incubator on 6April and hetching 21 days then 28th we have 33 chicks so we success.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

It was June 1988 when I participated in a workshop where I met some foreign visitors looking for a host family. August the same year I hosted eight international volunteers from different nations. They participated in 15 days home stay, cultural exchange and social & rural development work camps. That was my first experience and it was very successful. My family and the whole community gave the visitors a warm welcome. The community and youth of Kanda participated and my family was very cooperative with hosting the international volunteers, who adjusted very well to our family life. I felt good because the visiting group were very flexible, civilized and had a good sense of humor. It was a valuable exchange because I learnt some skills and increased my knowledge from them.

I still participate in international seminars, workshops, training programs, fairs and festivals in India and exhibit photographs of the volunteers and village tourism so people are aware of the opportunities we provide.

My family members will also be your hosts. Myself and my wife Hema have six children together. The eldest girl Praveen is married and lives about 45 minutes away – a breathtaking walk through the paddy fields and hills. Jeetendra is my eldest son, Diptee is my second daughter (also married), Renu and Gunga are my other daughters in order of age and Sadju is my youngest son. Jeetendra’s wife also lives with us, as does my grandson Gautam and Saorabh (Praveen’s sons).

Jeevan

Read Full Post »

Kanda is remote, in the district of Bageshwar, in the Kumaoni hill range of Uttaranchal, a hilly province of northern India. It is a dispersed settlement cluster of about 30 villages, home to over 20,000 people and is some 86 kilometers from well-known Almora. Bowl-shaped Kanda valley settlements have an approximate elevation of 1400 meters to 1800 meters. The people of the area are mainly involved in agricultural farming, forestry, horticulture, tea gardening, handicraft, jewelry, and lately, mining. Soldiering is also in the Kanda blood. Many of its villagers are in the armed forces or live as retirees in Kanda, surviving on the money-order economy.
Amidst the terraced lands, the Kumaoni people are nestled at the foot of the astounding Himalayan range, the snow capped peaks of which stand out from behind the rich forested slopes on any sunny day. The small villages of Kanda have pure air and a healthy environment offered by the mountain scenery. The landscape is visually appealing as its terraced farming and numerous wild flowers present pleasing shades of color to the eyes. The hills around Kanda offer an unrivaled tranquility.
The Kanda area is distinct for its rich biodiversity of flora and fauna, as well as its pristine scenic beauty. It is a paradise for nature lovers and wildlife enthusiasts. The whole Kumaoni area is full of medicinal plants, spices and herbs, many of which grow naturally around agricultural fields and are cultivated by the local farmers.
The people of Kanda are poor. Over 50% of villagers live below the poverty line, lacking even the basics of life such as health and sanitation facilities and adequate shelter. Land holdings are small, as they have been divided among sons for several generations. Cow, buffalo, goat, and ox rearing is very popular for meat, milk, compost, and the plowing of fields. People are religious in nature and women do a lot of work in the home as well as in the fields. Dependence on natural resources is high and thus resource management is necessary for a balanced and sustainable way of life. Making local people economically strong is one of the ways of reducing their unrestricted dependence on the natural resources, and thus conserving the riches with which nature has endowed them.

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

The Dairy project have 4 high milk production cows,the efforts of BAIF breeding AI benefit.
Jeevan
farmers Field School

Read Full Post »

Hi

My name is martin and I am writing this blog at long last.
This is my second time at the R.O.S.E. KANDA.
I came here in 2009 and spent three weeks.
To me it was like stepping back in time to rural Ireland of 40 years ago.
I grew up on a farm of about the same size doing many of the things that the people of the hills take part in to day.
Planting, working with cows and doing other things that to make a living.
It made me realize how hard my parents had to work to make a living whist I was enjoying my childhood
So this year I was determined to return with some help and ideas to improve the working lives of the local community.
To this end I brought an incubator, so that chicks can be hatched and the resulting chicks can b given out to the local women so that they can have a source of protein and possibly sell the eggs to have extra income.
In the two years I have come I have met great people both in the local community and in the volunteer.
The host family has become great personal friends to me.
I have been invited to many local cultural events weddings, temple , birthday parties.

In all I would say that it has been the best experience of life.
It also inspires me to see the youth of the UK and the rest of the world reaching out and helping and if that is the standard we can all have hope in the world for a better future for us all.

Martin volunteer 2009 /2010
20th April 2010
.

Read Full Post »

I stayed at Rose Kanda for Three weeks in total. During my time here I taught at both the English speaking public school and the Hindi School. The challenges I faced at each school were very different. At the public school the pupils knew an awful lot of English; they were extremely enthusiastic and keen to learn, however in their enthusiasm could be noisy and disruptive, so it was necessary to be strict and firm. I taught the oldest class at this school and I loved it! The class were brilliant, they are just so intelligent and eager. I think they had been underestimated in the past and I taught them sentence structure, semi-colons and colons and literary techniques such as similes, metaphors and alliteration, all in the space of a few weeks. If teaching advanced material is daunting and not an appealing task to you, there are younger classes with more basic punctuation etc. to teach. Some volunteers also taught Maths. The children are really interested in you personally, and love to learn about life in England.

At the Hindi school the children do not know much English, they are very poor and probably need the volunteer help more; not many of the volunteers have gone to this school. The teachers themselves speak very little English and have taught the children some bad habits. The children are shy, and teaching here is basic and involves constant drilling of simple information, lots of enthusiasm and patience to illicit from some unwilling participants.

My stay at the house has been really comfortable. The food is delicious, the beds are hard but manageable, there isn’t a problem with mosquitoes and I’ve really enjoyed my cold bucket showers! It’s the most beautiful countryside you can possibly imagine, and the local people are so accommodating and friendly. It’s not recommended to walk around in the evenings, and we eat late and then go to our rooms, but in the day Kanda is the safest place imaginable. Although dodgy and unreliable, there is internet access in the village just a 15 to 20 minute walk from the house.

The family are so friendly and welcoming, and always try their best to make sure you settle in, and there is bound to be a great group of volunteers already here to keep you company.

I came here to gain confidence, and although the journey here was very hard, and Delhi was an unpleasant city to many of us, (definitely recommend booking the train to Haldwani in advance on cleartrip.com, and then getting Mr.Verma’s pickup service here) it’s all been part of the experience. It was my first journey away from home on my own, and although daunting, it’s been really satisfying and I have achieved everything I set out to do.

I have really enjoyed my stay and recommend it to anybody wanting to get away to a peaceful environment (the afternoons can be spent reading and relaxing, or helping more with the family) and help a community.

Nicola Hargreaves
U.K.
18-04-2010

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: